England, Day Six – Nottingham, York

Wednesday, May 22

We took time to see a little more of Nottingham before we got on the road. There is some pretty architecture in the city – lots of Art Nouveau detailing.

The Zara Building built 1903-4

The Zara Building built 1903-4

The Zara Building built 1903-4

The Zara Building window detail

I also liked the combinations of old buildings with modern shops on the ground floor.

Nottingham Old and New 2 Nottingham Old and New

We found a few cool vintage shops. I really wanted this great suitcase picnic set but couldn’t see a way to get it home. I found a nice black scarf with white polka dots instead.

Vintage Picnic Set

We headed out of town towards York but decided on a whim to stop at Bolsover Castle. It was pretty cold and windy but that meant hardly any visitors. We spent a couple of hours exploring.

It looks forbidding from the outside but from what I gathered was really built more for the entertainment of a wealthy aristocrat and his playboy son.

We walked through huge red gates.

Bolsover Castle

Which opened up onto the Great Court with an old copper beech tree in the center.

Bolsover Castle

There was a scale model and a floor plan of the castle at the entrance.

Bolsover Castle

It’s only a model.

Bolsover Castle

The Riding House Range on the left looked to be fairly intact with some sections being restored. From bolsover-castle.co.uk:

“William Cavendish was an avid horse rider and had this range of buildings built in the 1630′s to accommodate, train and show off his horses. Cavendish trained in horsemanship at the Royal Mews and was considered an authority on the art of Manège [specialized horse training similar to dressage], so much so that he was engaged as tutor to the Young Prince Charles (later to become Charles II).”

The floor of the Riding House:

Bolsover Castle

A cool pattern of oak arches supporting the Riding House roof:

Bolsover Castle

The Terrace Range, a set of state rooms, banqueting halls and kitchens for entertaining royalty, was mostly ruins.

Bolsover Castle

There was enough remaining, though, to get a rough idea of the layout of the kitchens, hearths and larders.

Bolsover Castle

It was interesting to look up from the lowest level and see the chimneys and a fireplace on the top floor.

Bolsover Castle

From the rear of the Terrace Range, we had a nice view of pretty English countryside.

Bolsover Castle

After leaving the Terrace Range, we explored the Little Castle. It was in fine shape with lots of vibrant paints but it wasn’t clear how much was restored and how much was original.

Bolsover Castle

There were some gorgeous rooms in this castle.

Bolsover Castle

In some rooms, every inch was decorated. This is the ceiling of the Star Chamber.

Bolsover Castle

Bolsover Castle

Bolsover Castle

Bolsover Castle

We climbed a worn staircase with tiny doors to get to each floor.

Bolsover Castle

We strolled through the Fountain Garden and saw the Venus Fountain with some rather…adult sculptures. I love the little alcoves built into the walls of the garden – clearly designed for secret romantic trysts.

Bolsover Castle

We wandered back to the car and headed on towards York. We checked into our lodging at 23 St. Mary’s and took a stroll before supper.

We were centrally-located and only a couple of blocks from the Museum Gardens and the ruins of St. Mary’s Abbey. There has been an abbey on this site since 1055. It underwent several changes of leadership/affliation over the next couple of centuries. These ruins are all that remain of the wealthy Benedictine abbey built between 1271 and 1294.

York St Mary's Abbey 1

The abbey was mostly destroyed after Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in 1539. Bits and pieces of the abbey are still visible and the stone provides an interesting contrast to the lush grass.

St. Mary's Abbey

It was a good setting to try out my infrared filter. It seems to work best with a variety of textures like trees and stone.

St. Mary's Abbey

We walked past York Minster which we planned on visiting the next day. There has been a church on this site since 627. This most “recent” version was built over the course of 250 years  – from 1220 to 1472.

York Minster 1

Like Notre Dame, the closer we got, the more elaborate the detailing.

York Minster     York Minster

York Minster     York Minster

York Minster     York Minster

We had supper and called it a night.

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “England, Day Six – Nottingham, York

  1. Anonymous

    Loved all your photos, especially the castle model, and the Actual Castle, and the top of the castle – guess it really was a castle, huh, with those castle things on top : ). Also loved the photo of the tiny doors with large person on stair outside, and well, also the Abbey Walls, and the Gargoyles, and the fact that the York Minster site has contained a church since the 600’s. Outrageous! especially to Americans. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
    1. Kate Post author

      I know! I think probably a lot of Americans think castle=crenellations (aka castle things :-). Either that castle=Disney castle pointy turrets. I wonder if other countries have that automatic association.

      Reply
  2. Bluetick runner/Trella

    “It’s only a model” (snort, good one!) Ok, my favorite thing so far, of all your pix, are the ruins of the beautiful abbey with it’s perfect landscaping. How big are the grounds? Lotsa acreage? I could hang out there all day and would love to see a sunset. So Beautiful….

    Reply
    1. Kate Post author

      23 St Mary’s was nice and the staff was great. Chatty and friendly with local information. The rooms were a little on the frilly side. Kind of reminded me of that BBC comedy Keeping Up Appearances if you’ve seen that.

      Reply
  3. Nicki Dennis

    HI Kate – this is an odd request – I am publishing a physics book with the UK’s institute of physics and I need a photo of a floor plan of Bolsover castle – when I googled this your name came up with a great photo. I am wondering if we could use it and give you an acknowledgement – and a free copy of the book when it comes out – its called physics for art and architecture – its in our concise physics series.. If you could e-mail me I can send you a form to say that you are allowing us to use your photo. Great site by the way! nicki.dennis@concisephysics.org

    Reply

I encourage feedback from readers - on content, on my writing, on anything at all! Feel free to add a comment below.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s